Open Access

Erratum to: A rapid evidence review on the effectiveness of institutional health partnerships

Globalization and Health201612:3

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12992-016-0140-5

Published: 21 January 2016

The original article was published in Globalization and Health 2015 11:48

It has come the publisher’s attention that the original version of this article [1] unfortunately published Tables 1 and 2 in the incorrect order. All references to the tables in the main body of the text were correct in the original article. The tables have been updated in the original version of this article accordingly, and published in this Erratum for quick reference.
Table 1

Level of evidence and type of document reviewed

 

Level 0

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

Total

Grey literature

2

1

14

0

0

0

17

Journal article

8

6

10

0

0

3

27

Total

10

7

24

0

0

3

44

Table 2

Definitions or descriptions of IHPs from the three systematic reviews included in this rapid review

Health links are long term partnerships between UK health institutions and their counterparts in developing countries. …. Links are typically small partnerships that work in areas such as capacity building or clinical service delivery. Whereas some links are set up as small charities with expenses covered by the individuals involved, others are funded directly by the NHS. Ultimately, one of the main objectives of health links is to improve the health of the population in the corresponding developing country.”

… international partnerships, … lead, stimulate, and facilitate action on health challenges through programming, advocacy and technical support. …. Partners increasingly seek mutuality of benefits, including two way flow of energies, expertise and knowledge to justify investment.”

Partnerships to share learning and resources between UK institutions and collaborators in Low and Lower Middle Income Countries are one model to improve health care delivery. It has been proposed that such links promote genuine understanding and respect for different societies and cultures, offer a more sustainable, locally led model of development, build capacity and strengthen health systems in developing countries.”

Smith [2]

Syed et al. [3]

Jones et al. [3]

A slight change in the author details section of the PDF was also made with this Erratum. The 4th affiliation incorrectly read: GIZ (The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH), Dublin, Ireland. In the original article, the city and country have been amended to read: Berlin, Germany.

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Capacity Development International
(2)
European ESTHER Alliance
(3)
Forum for Global Health
(4)
GIZ (The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH)

References

  1. Ema K, Doyle V, Weakliam D, Schönemann Y. A rapid evidence review on the effectiveness of institutional health partnerships. Globalization and Health. 2015;11:48.View ArticleGoogle Scholar
  2. Easterbrook PJ. Institutional partnerships in global health. Clin Med. 2011;11(2):112–3.View ArticleGoogle Scholar
  3. Haglund MM, Kiryabwire J, Parker S, Zomorodi A, MacLeod D, Shroeder R, et al. Surgical capacity building in Uganda through twinning, technology, and training camps. World J Surg. 2011;35(6):1175–82.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Kelly et al. 2016

Advertisement