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Table 1 Descriptive summary of studies

From: A scoping review on the measurement of transnationalism in migrant health research in high-income countries

Descriptor Studies
N = 47, n(%)
Year of publication
 Jan 2004 – Dec 2010 7(14.9%)
 Jan 2011 – Dec 2019 37(78.7%)
 Jan 2020 – Aug 2020 3(6.4%)
Study design
 Cross-sectional survey 38(80.9%)
 Longitudinal surveya 5(10.6%)
 Mixed methods 4(8.5%)
Location of study (migrant resettlement country)b
 North America
  United States 23(48.9%)
  Canada 5(10.6%)
  Unspecified 1(2.1%)
 Europe
  Netherlands 10(21.3%)
  France 4(8.5%)
  Ireland 2(4.3%)
  Denmark 1(2.1%)
  Finland 1(2.1%)
  Germany 2(4.3%)
  Spain 1(2.1%)
  Portugal 1(2.1%)
  Italy 1(2.1%)
  United Kingdom 2(4.3%)
  Unspecified 1(2.1%)
 New Zealand 2(4.3%)
 Australia 1(2.1%)
 Other countries 2(4.3%)
Migrants’ region of originb
 Sub-Saharan Africa 12(25.5%)
 Africa, unspecified 4(8.5%)
 Northern Africa / Middle East / Turkey 7(14.9%)
 Latin America and ‘Black’ Caribbean  
  Mexico 12(25.5%)
  Central America 6(12.8%)
  South America 4(8.5%)
  Caribbean (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic) 10(21.3%)
  Latin America, unspecified 12(25.5%)
  ‘Black’ Caribbean 4(8.5%)
  Caribbean, unspecified 3(6.4%)
 Asia
  Southeast Asia 4(8.5%)
  South Asia 3(6.4%)
  East Asia (China, Korea) 9(19.1%)
  Unspecified 4(8.5%)
 Europe (mostly Eastern Europe) 9(19.1%)
 Australia/New Zealand 1(2.1%)
 North America 3(6.4%)
 Unspecified 3(6.4%)
Sample size (quantitative)
 50–500 13(27.7%)
 501–1000 9(19.1%)
 1001–2000 15(31.9%)
 2001–5000 5(10.6%)
 5001–10,000 3(6.4%)
 10,001-20,000 1(2.1%)
  > 20,000 1(2.1%)
Migrants’ generationb
 1st generation migrants 47(100%)
 2nd generation migrants 12(25.5%)
  ≥ 3rd generation migrants 3(6.4%)
Migrants’ statusb
 Immigrantsc 46(97.9%)
 Refugees and/or Asylum-seekersd 11(23.4%)
 Undocumented migrants 17(36.2%)
  1. aOne study conducted a cross-sectional analysis
  2. bA study may be counted in more than one category so percentages do not add to 100%
  3. cBroadly defined, including those who immigrated through economic, family and business categories; most studies did not specify the immigrant categories and only described the population as “immigrants”
  4. dIncludes those who had an asylum history but obtained residency status